Posts Tagged ‘history’

Kings and Queens of England Poster

[facebook-like id=”1″]

I recently received an excellent wall chart titled Kings and Queens of England and Other European Nations. Here is my review for all genealogists with royalty in their lines—and for any other history buffs out there.

Kings and Queens of England Chart

Kings & Queens of EnglandAt last, I now have a better understanding of how and where all these kings and queens are related. This chart is a masterpiece of construction that is really easy to follow. It outlines the direct lineage and doesn’t go off into the many hundreds of sidelines that would only confuse the overall picture.  

The Kings and Queens of England chart comes rolled in a tube for protection. When unfurled, it measures a 24″ by 36″ and is printed in color on quality glossy paper. It costs $24.95 in the USA, and £15.95 in the UK. (See “Where to Buy” heading below for links to Amazon). 

Another thing I really like, is that all charts from this company are printed in a carbon neutral plant using environmentally friendly inks.

Kings and Queens Who’s Who

Published in August 2013 by UsefulCharts Publishing, the Kings and Queens of England chart is right up to date and includes the new Prince George of Cambridge. 

The company website says, “[The chart] shows the direct line between Queen Elizabeth II and historical figures such as Charlemagne, Alfred the Great, and William the Conqueror. It includes every monarch of England from 927 to today (Houses of Wessex, Plantagenet, Tudor, Stuart, Hanover, Windsor, etc.) and shows the Scottish royal line from Robert the Bruce as well as several independent Welsh and Irish kings. It also includes many of the contemporary monarchs from neighboring countries such as Spain, France, the Netherlands, and Denmark (e.g. – Charles I of Spain, Louis XIV of France, Frederick the Great of Prussia, Napoleon Bonaparte, and more) and demonstrates how the current monarchs of Belgium, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and the UK are all descended from either Queen Victoria or King Christian IX (of Denmark), and in most cases, both.” 

Where to Buy Kings and Queens Poster Charts 

This outstanding chart is found on Amazon by clicking on www.amazon.com for USA, and on www.amazon.co.uk for UK.

CHARTS 2 FOR 3

 Among other things, the company also produces two more historical charts—Timeline of World History, and Greek Mythology Family Tree. These can be bought for $24.95 each, or bundled with the Kings and Queens of England saving 33% at $49.95 at www.amazon.com

Meet the Designer

UsefulCharts’ posters are designed by Matt Baker from Vancouver, BC. Matt has worked as both a teacher and a curriculum developer. He has always loved charts and considers himself to be a visual learner. His posters aim to capture large amounts of information in simple, easy-to-follow formats. His website is at www.usefulcharts.com

Matt helped establish and manage a non-profit community college in rural Sri Lanka where he also developed curriculum and taught classes in the liberal arts and sciences. In May 2009, he received a Public Service Honor Award from the Mayor of Nuwara Eliya, Sri Lanka for “unstinted service in the field of upgrading the leadership and language skills of the youth of this city.” 

Kings and Queens of England Highly Recommended

I highly recommend posters by Matt Baker—especially the Kings and Queens chart. What a vast number of hours must have gone into the production of this excellent visual aid. Congratulations!

My Review of “Stored Treasures” ~ A Memoir

My Review of Stored Treasures, a memoir by Minnie Crane with Genealogist Smadar Belkind Gerson.

Stored Treasures ~ A Memoir

Stored Treasure

Stored Treasures by Minnie Crane and her great-granddaughter Smadar Belkind Gerson is a fascinating book, full of interesting photographs and captivating stories from Minnie’s difficult childhood. After reading the complete memoir, I feel like I’ve met the family and struggled with them through their tumultuous history spanning two world wars, pandemics, and the Great Depression.

Born Menuche Kranowitz in Belitsa, Russia in 1896, Minnie changed her name to Minnie Crane when entering the USA through Ellis Island in 1914. Her birth town eventually became part of Belarus, a Jewish community destroyed by Nazis.

Inspiring and educational

Avid genealogist, Smadar Belkind Gerson, shares Minnie’s remarkable writings in a way that is both inspiring and educational. This memoir truly is a treasure Smadar Belkind Gersonworth reading by anyone interested in the Jewish immigration to America in the early 1900s. I recommend it as a well-written and accurate record of events that define world history.

The book can be found on Lulu here.

Genealogy Quote of the Week – Henry David Thoreau

This week’s genealogy quote comes from American author Henry David Thoreau, who was born July 12, 1817 and died May 6, 1862.

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau was an American author, poet, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, philosopher, and leading transcendentalist. He is best known for his book Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings. His books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry total over 20 volumes.

To quote from American Transcendentalism Web: “He worked for several years as a surveyor  and making pencils  with his father, but at the age of 28 in 1845, wanting to write his first book, he went to Walden pond and built his cabin on land owned by (Ralph Waldo) Emerson.

While at Walden, Thoreau did an incredible amount of reading and writing, yet he also spent much time ‘sauntering’ in nature. He gave a lecture and was imprisoned briefly for not paying his poll tax, but mostly he wrote a book as a memorial to a river trip he had taken with his brother, A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers.”

A Genealogy Quote from Henry David Thoreau

I found that they knew but little of the history of their race, and could be entertained by stories about their ancestors as readily as any way.” From The Writings of Henry David Thoreau, vol. 3, p. 150, Houghton Mifflin (1906). Talking about the Mohawk American Indians near Moosehead.
Email notifications
Archives